Search

 Dentist Melbourne cbd COVID-19 Policy v3

Last updated 4.30pm 16-03-20 

Note that items that are subject to change are highlighted in yellow, and should be confirmed on the Department of Health website at least daily https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov

 Dentist Melbourne CBD is closely monitoring the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. The health, safety, and well-being of our staff, patients and community is our top priority. At this time the number of cases in Australia is relatively small in number but contingency planning is well underway. We will continue to update everyone regularly to keep you informed.

Common COVID-19 symptoms

Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new virus that can cause an infection in people, including a severe respiratory illness. Many people who contract COVID–19 will suffer only mild symptoms. However early indications are that the elderly and people with pre-existing medical conditions are more at risk of experiencing severe symptoms. The most common symptoms reported include:

  • Fever
  • Breathing difficulties such as breathlessness
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Fatigue or tiredness.

 

Case Definitions

Confirmed COVID-19 case

A person who tests positive to a validated SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or has the virus identified by electron microscopy or viral culture.

Suspected Case

  1. If the patient satisfies both clinical and epidemiological criteria, they are classified as a suspected case:

Clinical criteria

Fever

OR

Acute respiratory infection (for example, shortness of breath or cough) with or without fever

AND

Epidemiological criteria

International travel in the 14 days before the onset of illness

OR

Close or casual contact in the 14 days before illness onset with a confirmed case of COVID-19.

  1. If the patient has severe community-acquired pneumonia (critically ill) and no other cause is identified, with or without recent international travel, they are classified as a suspect case.
  2. If the patient has moderate or severe community-acquired pneumonia (hospitalised) and is a healthcare worker, with or without international travel, they are classified as a suspect case.

Contact Definitions and Isolation Requirements

Staff may come in contact with someone who is suspected of having COVID-19 and may or may not subsequently be confirmed as positive.

A “close contact” is defined as someone who:

  • spent more than 15 minutes face-to-face with a person who has tested positive for coronavirus in the period extending from 24 hours before the onset of symptoms in that case, or
  • shared a closed space with a confirmed case for more than two hours in the period extending from 24 hours before the onset of symptoms.

Close contacts will be advised self-quarantine including restriction on travel until 14 days from the last contact with confirmed case.

A “casual contact” is any person having less than 15 minutes face-to-face contact with a symptomatic confirmed case in any setting, or sharing a closed space with a symptomatic person for less than two hours.

  • Casual contacts can attend public settings but should self-monitor for illness for 14 days after the last unprotected contact with the infectious case. They should isolate at home if they develop symptoms and call the dedicated hotline on 1800 675 398.
  • Casual contacts do not need to restrict their movement. However, they should isolate themselves and contact the department if they develop symptoms in the 14 daysafter last contact with the infectious case.

Healthcare workers and other contacts who use full PPE while caring for a symptomatic confirmed COVID-19 case are not considered to be close contacts, but they should be alert to symptoms.

Travel

Effective now through to at least April 30:

 

Exclusion from work

  • If you develop any symptoms (fever, cough, sore throat, fatigue or shortness of breath), you MUST advise Dr. Leila Zamani and not attend work until you receive further advice.
  • Anyone returning from overseastravel during this period must contact Dr. Leila Zamani  prior to returning to work. The Federal Government will now require all people returning from overseas to self-isolate for 14 days.
  • Any healthcare worker who has compatible illness (COVID-19 symptoms), whether having travelled internationally or not, must not attend work until they have been assessed by a medical practitioner as being clear. This will involve having a medical assessment and a swab test for COVID-19, which must be negative. It is recommended that medical practitioners do not test or treat themselves and seek medical care from another medical practitioner.
  • If a member of staff has a confirmed case of COVID-19 they must not return to work until they have been assessed by a medical practitioner as fully recovered and have returned a negative COVID-19 test.
  • Anyone who works in healthcare or residential care and has been to a higher risk country (mainland China, Iran, South Korea or Italy)should not attend work for 14 days since leaving that country.
  • Information on self-isolation can be found here – https://www.health.gov.au/resources/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-isolation-guidance

 

Work from Home (if applicable)

Dentist Melbourne cbd has plans in place for staff members to work from home if required.

Staying Healthy

  • Wash hands often with soap and running water, for at least 20 seconds. Dry with paper towel or hand dryer.
  • Try not to touch your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. If you don’t have a tissue cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve or elbow.
  • Isolate yourself at home if you feel sick. If you take medication ensure you have adequate supplies.
  • Phone your GP first if you need medical attention. They will tell you what to do.
  • Continue healthy habits: exercise, drink water, get plenty of sleep.
  • Don’t wear a face mask if you are well.
  • Buy an alcohol-based hand sanitiser with over 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Get the flu shot (available April).
  • Shaking hands is optional!
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.

External Events

Effective Monday 16 March, the Australian Government has advised that non-essential gatherings of more than 500 people should be cancelled. At present this does not include schools, universities, public transport or airports. Therefore, larger meetings and gatherings such as conferences and sporting events are likely to be cancelled.

  • Staff should not attend any face-to-face work-related external events
  • Staff are also strongly encouraged not to attend non-essential large gatherings of people for personal reasons
  • Anyone, who has attended a face-to-face gathering of more than 500 peoplemust contact  Dr. Leila Zamani and not attend work until you receive further advice.

 

Dentist Melbourne cbd COVID-19 Exposure Response Plan

Last updated 5.00pm 16-03-20 

Note that items that are subject to change are highlighted in yellow, and should be confirmed on the Department of Health website at least daily https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov

Introduction

COVID-19 is becoming increasingly prevalent in Australia. This increases the likelihood of an exposure event occurring in the workplace.

Initially, most of these possible exposure events are likely to involve people who do not have COVID-19. As person-to-person transmission events begin to occur in the community, the chances of a true COVID-19 exposure event will increase.

All exposure events need to be treated as true exposure events until the diagnosis of the suspected case is confirmed.

Purpose

The purpose of this plan is to provide guidance to staff on how to respond to a possible COVID-19 exposure event in the workplace.

Definitions

COVID-19

Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness caused by a new virus. Symptoms range from a mild cough to pneumonia. Some people recover easily, others may get very sick very quickly. There is evidence that it spreads from person to person. Good hygiene can prevent infection.

Exposure event

An event where people in the workplace are exposed to a suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19.

Suspected COVID-19 case definition

  1. If the patient satisfies both clinical and epidemiological criteria, they are classified as a suspected case:

Clinical criteria

Fever

OR

Acute respiratory infection (for example, shortness of breath or cough) with or without fever

AND

Epidemiological criteria

International travel in the 14 days before the onset of illness

OR

Close or casual contact in the 14 days before illness onset with a confirmed case of COVID-19.

  1. If the patient has severe community-acquired pneumonia (critically ill) and no other cause is identified, with or without recent international travel, they are classified as a suspect case.
  2. If the patient has moderate or severe community-acquired pneumonia (hospitalised) and is a healthcare worker, with or without international travel, they are classified as a suspect case.

Confirmed COVID-19 case definition

A person who tests positive to a validated SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or has the virus identified by electron microscopy or viral culture.

Casual contact

Casual contact is defined as any person having less than 15 minutes face-to-face contact or sharing a closed space with a confirmed case for less than two hours.

Because casual contact is likely to carry a much lower risk of transmission, contact needs to have occurred during the period from the onset of symptoms in the confirmed case until the confirmed case is no longer considered infectious, in order to be considered a casual contact.

Close contact

Greater than 15 minutes face-to-face or the sharing of a closed space for more than two hours with a confirmed case without recommended personal protective equipment (PPE), which is droplet and contact precautions for the definition of contact.

Healthcare workers (HCWs) and other contacts who have taken recommended infection control precautions, including the use of recommended PPE (droplet and contact precautions for the purposes of this contact definition), while caring for a suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19 are not considered to be close contacts. However, these people should be advised to self-monitor and if they develop symptoms consistent with COVID-19 infection they should isolate themselves and notify the Department of Health and Human Services on 1300 651 160 so they can be tested and managed as a suspected COVID-19 case.

Self-isolation

If you have been advised that you must self-isolate, you should remain at home or in your hotel (as applicable) and not go to public places including work, school, childcare, university or public gatherings. Only people who usually live with you should be in the home. Do not see visitors. If you are in a hotel, avoid contact with other guests or staff. If you are well, there is no need to wear surgical masks at home. Ask others who are not in isolation to get food and necessities for you. If you must leave home, such as to seek medical care, wear a surgical mask. If you don’t have a mask, take care to not cough or sneeze on others.

Possible exposure event in the dental practice

  • As soon as a possible exposure event is known, all future patient appointments for that day should be cancelled until appropriate advice has been received.
  • Staff and patients should remain where they are until further information is received. No one should leave except in the case of an emergency requiring evacuation.
  • If the person with suspected COVID-19 is still at the workplace, they should be isolated in a room with the door shut and provided with a surgical mask with at least Level 2 barrier protection. Communication with them should occur only by phone or email. The air conditioning shall be temporarily switched off in that room as a precautionary measure, until the unwell person has departed, and the room has been cleaned. Refer to the Clinic cleaning section (below), and the COVID-19 Cleaning Protocol.
  • Contact your state and territory health department. Contact details are available at https://www.health.gov.au/about-us/contact-us/local-state-and-territory-health-departments.Communicate to all staff the details of the exposure event and further instructions on what they are being asked to do.
  • All communications about the exposure event are considered confidential and not to be communicated to members or the public.
  • If there is a confirmed exposure event at the practice, notify Workcover and relevant insurers.

Isolation requirements

  • Depending on advice from the COVID-19 hotline and the Vic DHHS:
    • At 15-03-20, the Australian Government advice requires 14 days self-isolation for close contacts of confirmed cases, and all travelers that have returned from overseas. Refer to the Australian Government Department of Health website for current information:
    • https://www.health.gov.au/resources/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-isolation-guidance
    • Healthcare workers, who have been overseas in the past 14 days and are unwell with a compatible illness should not attend work and seek appropriate medical care.
    • All unwell healthcare workers with compatible symptoms should consider being tested for COVID-19, irrespective of travel history.
    • Employers wishing to apply additional exclusion criteria to employees should contact the ADA HR Advisory Service for advice hrhotline@ada.org.au or 1300 232 462
  • Requirements for staff:
    • Confirmed COVID-19 case exposure:
      • Seek advice from Australian Government Department of Health Coronavirus health information line on 1800 020 080 Follow Australian Government and/or State or Territory Department of Healthself-isolation advice.
      • Seek medical advice if you begin to feel unwell.
      • Notify work if you develop possible COVID-19 symptoms
    • Suspected COVID-19 case exposure:
      • Notify work at earliest convenience on 04 0990 7525 and melbournecbddentist@gmail.com
      • If possible, minimise attendance at the practice of staff exposed to the suspected COVID-19 case until the outcome of the COVID-19 test for the suspected case is known.
      • Anyone, who becomes unwell with possible COVID-19 symptoms, is to self-isolate and seek medical advice.
      • Notify work if you develop possible COVID-19 symptoms

Leave arrangements

  • Anyone who is unwell, is caring for a dependent who is unwell, or is issued a medical certificate by their GP will be eligible for paid personal leave, in accordance with the employer’s leave policy. Employees, who are required to self-isolate, but remain well are encouraged to work from home if possible.
  • Review HR advice at https://www.ada.org.au/covid19
  • Contact the HR Advisory Team at hrhotline@ada.org.au or on 1300 232 462 for further advice.
  • Otherwise, staff who choose or are asked to self-isolate (without a medical certificate) can take other types of paid leave, or work from home if possible. Please discuss this with your employer for further information.

Clinic cleaning

  • Following a possible exposure event, the clinic, reception and waiting areas must be thoroughly cleaned with disinfectant as a precautionary measure
  • Particular attention should be paid to cleaning surfaces, computers, bathrooms, and door handles and any other surface that is regularly touched (e.g. dishwasher buttons, taps, lift buttons).
  • Cleaners must wear appropriate PPE, e.g. a surgical mask, eye protection, apron and gloves.
  • Refer to the COVID-19 Cleaning Protocol for advice on suitable cleaning agents, PPE, procedures, and correct disposal of PPE and other items after cleaning is completed.

Contact tracing

  • Establish movements of the person with suspected/confirmed COVID-19 within the practice. Establish dates and times of possible exposure.
  • Determine who may have come in contact with this person.
  • Seek advice from the Australian Government Department of Health Coronavirus health information line on 1800 020 080 on whether people, who may have been exposed need to be contacted, and who is responsible for this.

Impact on business continuity

The practice will be guided by the appropriate advice from Australian Government and/or State or Territory Department of Health as to whether and when patient treatment can recommence.

Communication

  • All communications about the exposure event are considered confidential and not to be communicated to members or the public or the media (including posting on social media)
  • Advice from the Australian Government and/or State or Territory Department of Health will be considered when informing members and visitors who have visited the practice during the possible exposure period
  • Do not use social media to contact patients to reschedule appointments. Consider using Messenger, email, phone calls, or an SMS service, such as Value SMS, Vision 6, or SMS Broadcast. Practice owners/managers are responsible for determining the most appropriate communication method and provider for this purpose.
  • Media enquiries should be directed to the practice owner in the first instance. Practices are advised to contact their ADA Branch for assistance in dealing with the media.

Further information

Government COVID-19 advice

As the situation changes very rapidly, staff are advised to check the Department of Health website for updates on at least a daily basis if seeking COVID-19 advice: https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov

Telephone enquiries: Coronavirus Health Information Line (National): 1800 020 080

Australian Dental Association

ADA has information for members at https://www.ada.org.au/Covid19

Members can also contact their local Australian Dental Association Branch.

Tooth Cavities: How to Stop Them from Spreading?

When it comes to oral health, the most common oral disease is tooth decay. As per a national oral health study conducted by the Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health (ARCPOH), one-third of the Australian adult population (aged 15 and above) suffer from tooth decay that goes untreated. This decay essentially a process of harmful bacteria, breaking down the protective enamel around your teeth, in turn leading to cavities.

What are cavities?

Tooth cavities, also known as dental caries, are small holes or openings that form in the teeth owing to decay. Such holes can expose nerve endings in your teeth, increasing the dangers of deep-rooted infections, tooth loss and more.

Moreover, it is important to note that these cavities are contagious. They can spread from sharing food, utensils, sneezing and mouth to mouth contact. It is therefore necessary to prevent such spread, especially if you have children who are more prone to contracting caries.

Prevention Measures

Given below is a list of measures that can help arrest the incidence and spread of tooth cavities.

  1. Follow a Healthy Dental Routine
    As per Australia’s Oral Health Tracker, only 51% of Australian adults follow the dental routine of brushing twice a day. Such carelessness can put you at a greater risk of contracting cavities. Hence, it is always wise to set a healthy dental routine and follow it sincerely. This will include:
  • Brushing as recommended by your dentist or , generically, twice a day in the morning and in the night.
  • Flossing thoroughly after brushing and after meals.
  • Using a potent mouthwash to clean your mouth of any harmful remnants.

It is also usually suggested that you use a fluoride-rich toothpaste that will help strengthen resistance to tooth decay by forming more enamel, thereby preventing cavities. Other than this, it is also recommended that you opt for a chlorhexidine mouthwash that helps fight off bacteria and decreases the chances of cavities.

  1. Chew on Sugar-free Gums
    Sugar-free gums with a xylitol content can help in spreading cavities to a huge extent. Xylitol is naturally present alcohol in plant material that improves the production of saliva which in return helps in combating harmful bacteria that may lead to tooth decay and cavities. It is more advisable to chew on these in between meals to fully cleanse your mouth.
  1. Keep Sugar and Carbs at Bay
    Sugary foods are not just detrimental to your physical health but also to your oral health. Foods such as sodas, chocolates and more act as fodder for bacteria which may lead to cavities. Apart from this, foods that are rich in carbs such as chips, bread, pasta and more stick to your teeth and remain in your mouth for a longer time. These might also help bacteria thrive and give rise to cavities. Avoiding such diets will help maintain healthy pearly whites.
  1. Sip More Water
    Between brushing and flossing, the meals that you eat can get jammed between your teeth, building up more plaque in your mouth. Drinking water during these periods can help remineralise by forming more saliva which breaks plaque formation and keeps bacteria away and rinsing your mouth free of any food particles left behind. Additionally, drinking fluoridated water is even more beneficial.
  1. Schedule Regular Dental Visits
    Being disciplined with your dentist appointments and following up on time can also deter cavities. Regular check-ups will lead to thorough cleaning and will motivate you to follow a professionally devised dental routine, lowering the possibility of most oral diseases. Along with this, if you face acute pain and the cavity has already spread, your dentist can employ trusted treatments such as fillings, fluoride cleaning, crown caps and, in some worse cases, root canals and teeth extraction.

All the above solutions comprise of some of the most constructive ways to stay away from cavities.

Looking for dentists in Melbourne for regular checkups? Dr. Zamani is the best dentist in Melbourne CBD and Docklands. From teeth whitening in Melbourne, porcelain dental veneers treatment in Melbourne to routine appointments as well as cavity treatment, we provide everything under one roof.

Call on (03) 9670 9020 to book an appointment today!

What Foods Should You Avoid to Achieve Perfect Dental Health?

Your food habits affect your well-being in a number of ways. However, it has the most effect on your oral health. Eating food that is unhealthy for your teeth can cause diseases such as tooth decay. As per a report by FDI World Dental Federation, 100% adults and about 60-90% of school children suffer from dental caries. While this may seem like a minor and treatable issue, as per WHO’s dental fact sheet, it is also important to note that treatment of such oral conditions is expensive, averaging 5% of total health expenditure and 20% of out-of-pocket health expenditure in most high-income countries. Therefore, taking care of your dietary intake is a necessity.

Read more

Going for Implants? – Here’s Everything You Must Know About Dental Implants

The pain – both physical and mental – of losing a tooth or two is hard to bear. Besides, missing tooth/teeth not only affect your overall health but also takes a toll on self-esteem.  With new inventions and technological advancements in the dental field, there are numerous cosmetic dentistry solutions that can restore your smile to its original glory.  Among the many solutions, dental implants have become quite popular in recent times.

Read more

National Campaign Against Big Three Health Insurers

As reported in the Australian on 18 May 2016, Australia’s not for profit health insurance funds are set to launch a national television campaign to tackle the ‘big three’ companies, who they argue are fuelling affordability concern whilst enjoying rising profits. This is aimed at Bupa, Medibank and nib.

Read more

Health Insurance

The disparity between dental fees charged and dental rebates paid by insurers remains high and the differential seems to be increasing rather than narrowing. Private health insurance funds are permitted each year by the Health Minister to alter the premiums on their policies. On 1 April 2011, private health insurance premiums rose an average of 5.6% Australia’s then Health Minister, the Hon.

Read more

2011 Dental Fees Survey Shows Dentists Have Kept Lid on Fee Increases

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) indicates that while Australian health consumers are satisfied with their experiences with dentists, cost remains a significant barrier. The ABS report 4839.0 Patient Experiences in Australia: Summary of Findings, 2010-11 noted that just over one in four persons who needed to see a dental professional had delayed seeing or had not seen one in the previous 12 months because of the cost (26%).

Read more

IF YOU NEED A Dentist MAKE AN APPOINTMENT NOW!

Google Rating
4.8